R.I.P. Dolores O’Riordan

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Dolores O’Riordan passed way too young at the age of 46. 

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R.I.P. Fast Eddie Clarke

And with Eddie’s passing, the classic 1977 to 1982 line up of Motorhead is gone forever, but will not be forgotten.

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Left to right: Drummer Phil “Philthy Animal” Taylor (November 11, 2015), bassist & vocalist Ian “Lemmy” Kilmister (December 28, 2015), and guitarist “Fast” Eddie Clarke (January 11, 2018).

Younger Generation Is Buying Hard Copies Of Music

recordsWhen I was growing up; nothing was more exciting than heading to those local record shops and grabbing vinyl, cassettes, or CDs when they became cheap enough. After hitting up the new releases, I would head to the local pawnshop. There, you found some really great deals on CDs and cassettes. While you were there, you could check out the used guitars and basses. After the pawnshop visit, I would then hit up all of the guitar stores and see what new models were out there. This was a good way of meeting people and talking about music.

I remember when looking at records, the first thing you did was look at the artwork. With many of the Heavy Metal bands, they had gruesome album covers. Others had silly artwork or futuristic covers. Then you had some of those bands who were using models.

Then, the digital age came and all of a sudden, the music stores became a novelty store. It happened over a period of time, but then you saw the music stores being bought up by major chain stores; I knew the end of an era was near. It was sad! Me, like many others, grew up. However, twenty years later, I read an article about how the younger generation is now buying hard copies of music from their favorite artists.

records2.jpgWhat surprised me was the reemergence of the lp, known today as the vinyl record. So, I remembered that I had several records sitting in the loft of my garage and after my wife bought me a small record player one year for Christmas, I grabbed those old records and began to rediscover the analog style of music. It was crisp and clean sounding. It wasn’t muffled like that of some of the songs I have downloaded from the internet. Although, I wasn’t much of a fan of the digital download due to its quality. To me, it sounded muffled as being played under water. But, if you wanted a copy of the release, that’s what you had to do because of the fact that many artists titles, were out of print.

While watching the Guardians of the Galaxy, I noticed right away, up on the big screen, what did I see? It was a Sony Walkman and a mix cassette tape. Growing up, during the 1980’s and early 1990’s, who didn’t own a Walkman? I owned several of them. I went threw them like shoes. I just hated it when the battery was dying or if the Walkman ate my cassette.

Shortly after the movie’s release, tapes were cool again. Who growing up in the 1970’s through the 1990’s didn’t have a mix tape they made or owned hundreds of them? I know that I did. I recorded stuff off of the radio during the airing of the King Biscuit Hour. That’s how I got several live performances copied from bands like Danzig. Even to this day, I have four tapes that I recorded back in the early 1990’s of Christmas twisted tunes and songs from the 98 Rock “Brew Ha-ha!”

A friend had asked me how many records have I purchased over the last years, since he has over 500, plus several hundred CDs. I replied back to him, that I have “over 200 vinyl and still holding over several hundred CDs and 13,000 songs on my Zune player. You and I been at this for many many years now. Lol!”

So, how long will this trend last. I felt that the vinyl age has already hit its peak. Or did it? Time will only tell, until then, I am glad to see kids buying up records, tapes, and CDs once again and discover those bands I have been listening to for many years and in some cases rediscovering. What are your thoughts?